Courtenay Mayor Larry Jangula re-elected, but just two councillors keep seats

The Maple Pool campground zoning issue appeared to be the deciding factor in who got elected — or not — in Courtenay on Saturday. Incumbent Mayor Larry Jangula defeated challenger Jon Ambler by 3,483 votes to 2,502. Jangula said he believed his stand on the Maple Pool issue — plus a lot of door-knocking and hard work — brought him victory. Just about the entire Courtenay council, though, was wiped out. Doug Hillian and Manno Theos were the only two incumbents returned. They’ll be joined by newcomers David Frisch, Bob Wells, Rebecca Lennox and Erik Eriksson (who was a councillor some terms ago). Incumbents Starr Winchester and Bill Anglin were not returned. Mayor Jangula, who is to the right on fiscal issues and taxation, could have his hands full with this council, who are all, except for Manno Theos, firmly to the left. A non-binding referendum on paying to help the homeless through an increase in property taxation, was overwhelmingly in favour of the highest level — $10 per year — with 2,444 votes. The $0 option got 1,588 votes while the $5 option got 1,275. In the school board race, incumbent Janice Caton was returned in Courtenay, but not Donna Gambacorta. Newcomer Cliff Boldt, a retired teacher, will take her spot. Here are the unofficial election results: Mayor Larry Jangula 3,483 Jon Ambler 2,502 Council Elected David Frisch 3,671 Manno Theos 3,033 Bob Wells 2,985 Rebecca Lennox 2,835 Doug Hillian 2,592 Erik Eriksson 2,448 Not elected Starr Winchester 2,338 Bill Anglin 1,900 Marcus Felgenhauer 1,800 Dan Doerksen 1,722 George Knox 1,452 Terry Chaney 1,351 Stu McInnis 1,196 School...

Courtenay voters give Jangula four more years

Scott Stanfield Record Staff Larry Jangula will be serving his second term as Mayor of Courtenay. According to preliminary results in Saturday’s election, he collected 3,483 votes. His opponent, Jon Ambler, garnered 2,502 votes. “I’m sort of in shock,” Jangula said, noting a new-look council with the exception of Manno Theos and Doug Hillian, who finished second and fifth in the vote for six council seats. “We have a mixture of young people and some seasoned people. We’re going to work together and bring the city forward.” Newcomer David Frisch topped the polls with 3,671 votes, followed by Theos at 3,033. Two other new members of council — Bob Wells and Rebecca Lennox — were third and fourth in voting at 2,985 and 2,835 respectively. Hillian retained his seat on council with 2,592 votes while Erik Eriksson — who had served a previous term on council — was sixth in the polls with 2,443 votes. The other candidates finished as follows: Starr Winchester (2,333), Bill Anglin (1,900), Marcus Felgenhauer (1,800), Dan Doerksen (1,722), George Knox (1,452), Terry Lee Chaney (1,351) and Stu MacInnis (1,196). “The people have put together the team that they want to govern Courtenay for the next four years,” said Ambler, who served the last two terms as a councillor. “That’s the people’s choice and I respect that.” Jangula hopes the Maple Pool issue will be settled shortly. The city is embroiled in a legal battle with the owners of the campsite, which provides low-rent housing for 57 at-risk individuals. Technically, zoning prohibits the couple from housing people on the property. “That was the number-one issue...

Chamber Business E-News & Media Releases

Courtenay Candidates’ Responses Date:  11/13/2014 COURTENAY Jon Ambler – Mayoral Candidate What is the passion that inspires you to run for council? My passion? Courtenay is a vibrant and unique city: a great place to live, work and play. I am inspired to use the leadership skills, training and experience I gained through my Air Force career and on Council to lead our great City; I believe it is my civic duty to do this. I believe under my leadership Council can govern ethically, effectively, efficiently and economically. Such governance will enable our citizens, institutions, communities and businesses to thrive. What is your opinion of the Comox Valley Chamber’s governance review calling for a Provincial review of the existing municipal structure? I fully support an independent study to establish the facts of how the present structure is operating, and what could possibly be done to restructure our local governments to be more efficient in delivering services to citizens.  A thorough study may develop a number of better options than only amalgamation of the three municipalities or the status quo. What are your views on the Maple Pool situation? Recent Council action should resolve this unfortunate situation: Council will proceed with a rezoning application and suspend legal action until 2015, on the condition that the property owners meet flood construction and provincial guidelines, or prove that the land may be used safely. The owners must ensure that their rented units meet minimum residential safety standards. Those safety standards must be met for the well-being of the Maple Pool residents, as they must be for all Courtenay residents. How do you plan to...

List of Candidates & Responses

The responses of candidates set out below are the clearest and most accurate available from any source at the present time. The Comox Valley Record recently polled all candidates running in this election on a number of issues.  Unfortunately the Record’s question about Maple Pool was fundamentally and fatally flawed, resulting in a very confusing mishmash of responses making it very difficult to understand which candidates stand where. The Record asked each candidate to answer with a simple “yes” or “no” to the question “As opposed to spending money on a lawsuit, would you approve of taxpayer dollars being spent helping to bring Maple Pool Campground into compliance with zoning regulations”? Unfortunately, that question is akin to the famous question “Have you stopped beating your wife?”  That is so because it is really two separate questions rolled into one, together with an assumption which in fact is false.  The false assumption is that spending taxpayers’ money on rezoning is necessary in order for the lawsuit to be terminated.  The fact is that rezoning is completely unnecessary because the existing zoning does not apply to this property, and therefore there is no reason why public funds should be expended. So a candidate cannot answer “yes” or “no” to this compound double question without misrepresenting his/her position.  An affirmative response indicates the candidate is willing to spend public funds on a project which is totally unnecessary; if the candidate answers “no”, he/she indicates an unwillingness to terminate the lawsuit. We also forced the candidates to essentially answer “yes” or “no”.  But our question was a simple one, not a compound question. ...

Quotations From Chairman Ambler

Quotations From Chairman Ambler   On voting for a 20% pay increase for municipal directors, on a motion moved by him, at the Regional District: “If you pay peanuts, you get monkeys.” “If you think $600 will fill my pockets, it won’t.”   In response to angry taxpayers when he pushed through a motion to allow “any Council member that is willing and able to participate and travel to all such conferences”: “There are people in this community who know the price of everything and the value of nothing.”   On using a $1M federal grant for the $5.4M recreation center renovation: “What the staff is proposing to do is something I love to see them do, and that’s spend other people’s money.”   On justifying why Courtenay needs to build a new $2.5M fire training center when one already exists just 10 minutes away in Comox: “It’s going to be a completely different facility. It’s sort of like when you have hockey skills camp-there’s one for shooting, one for skating but you need a place to have practice or play shinny with the entire...